Communicating Through Color

Sometimes the art of communicating ideas is about the art of communicating through color. I’ve been aware of the Pantone annual report for several years, as many other Montréalers do, I have friends who work in the fashion business and use the info religiously to plan their work.

Last year the Pantone color of the year was Turquoise, in 2009 it was Mimosa, in 2008 it was Blue Iris, etc.

Well, this year (2011) the Pantone color of the year is Honeysuckle:

Honeysuckle emboldens us to face everyday troubles with verve and vigor. A dynamic reddish pink, Honeysuckle is encouraging and uplifting. It elevates our psyche beyond escape, instilling the confidence, courage and spirit to meet the exhaustive challenges that have become part of everyday life.

You know how they say a picture is worth a thousand words? Well, a color is something that is beyond words…it’s primal.

Honeysuckle is a captivating, stimulating color that gets the adrenaline going – perfect to ward off the blues…[it] may also bring a wave of nostalgia for its associated delicious scent reminiscent of the carefree days of spring and summer. – Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute®

Color goes inside of you and activates something in your soul, it communicates an idea that just goes without saying.

Color is a powerful communication tool, so how are you going to get it working for you?

For more about color read: Color: Messages and Meanings (A Pantone Color Resource) By Leatrice Eiseman

How to Tell A Story Without A Voice Over

Contrary to popular belief I’m not in the voice over business…I am in the storytelling business. Every script I receive is a story in one form or another and I’m hired to tell that story. If you’ve attended one of my lectures you will already know that this is my core approach to everything I do.

That said look at this awesome :30 second story, told without a voice over at all:

Communicating Through Social Media

Well, I’ve finally gone and done it, I’ve just stepped on to the Twitter stage. After months of considering adding it to my social media network I gave in to the urge. Whether you’re already in it or considering adding social media to your mix of communication devices here are 3 simple rules to remember:

1. Pull, don’t push. Social-media newbies often make the mistake of being too aggressive. Some people might respond to new Twitter followers with a ‘Thanks for following. Visit my Web site for a free … [insert whatever promotional message you’ve seen.].’ Social networks are about conversations that build relationships, not indiscriminate come-ons.

2. Forget about social-network omnipresence. No one expects you to be everywhere, choose the sites frequented by your customers/clients. At minimum, establish a presence at the big three. Think of them this way: LinkedIn is your business suit, Facebook is business casual, and Twitter is the 24/7 ongoing cocktail party.

3. Be yourself. If it’s still available, use your own name as a handle and your headshot as an avatar, even if you’re networking on behalf of your company. I believe that in social media people would rather relate to and build trust with other PEOPLE, rather than brands.

As quickly as social networking  media is developing so are the rules of the game. Making yourself familiar with online protocol will smooth your path to online success.

Join me on LinkedInFacebook and now Twitter.

Take the Radio Out of Radio

Noted radio consultant Mark Ramsey on his Hear 2.0 blog recently posed the question that if Amazon.com could “…disaggregate the “book” from a book and monetize it, how can you disaggregate the “radio” from your radio station and monetize that?” A fantastic observation on Mark’s part.

In fact I believe it is possible through the medium of podcasting. Which up until now has been the exclusive domain of the “weekend broadcaster” recorded live on their kitchen table. Radio can do a better job, after all it’s what we do. Imagine news-talk radio going more in depth on local stories they don’t usually give more than a 30 second set-up and sound bite to in a “60 Minutes” type of investigative show. Or music stations getting deeper into the music, again, something similar to VH1’s behind the music. The question remains, would listeners be willing to pay for it?

Take for example Scott Smith who launched his Motivation to Move website, blog and podcast in 2006 and has been enjoying significant success, boasting as many as 40-thousand paying subscribers.

Can radio take “the radio” out of radio? Oh yes they can! It’s a matter of getting out of the tiny box they’ve placed themselves into …pun intended.

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